Charts display your search answer in a visual way.

Your search needs at least one attribute and one measure to be presented as a chart. When you choose to display your answer as a chart, ThoughtSpot will assign it the best fit chart type.

You can choose from a large number of chart types in ThoughtSpot. Each chart type provides you with a different visualization for your answer.

You can also adjust the axes, labels, and view of the chart.

About chart types

You can choose from a large number of chart types in ThoughtSpot. Each chart type provides you with a different visualization for your answer.

To change the chart type of your answer:

  1. Click Change visualization to get a palette of charts, maps, pivot table, and so on (scroll down to see more.)

  2. Click a different chart or visualization type.

Note: Some chart types may be unavailable for you to select depending on the columns in your search. For example, if your search does not contain at least one geographical column then you will not be able to select any of the geo chart types. Unavailable chart types are grayed out. Hovering over one will tell you what columns are needed before you can choose it.

  • Column charts
    The column chart is one of ThoughtSpot’s simplest, yet most versatile chart type. More often than not, the column chart will be chosen as your default chart type.
  • Bar charts
    The bar chart is very similar to the column chart. The only difference is that it is oriented the other way.
  • Line charts
    Like the column chart, the line chart is one of ThoughtSpot’s simplest, yet most versatile chart type. More often than not the line chart will be chosen as your default chart type.
  • Pie charts
    The pie chart is a classic chart type that displays your search in a circle. The pie chart ThoughtSpot shows is in the shape of a doughnut.
  • Area charts
    The area chart is based on the line chart, but has filled in regions.
  • Scatter charts
    The scatter chart is useful for finding correlations or outliers in your data.
  • Bubble charts
    The bubble chart displays three dimensions of data with each containing a set of values.
  • Pareto charts
    The pareto chart is a type of chart that contains both columns and a special type of line chart.
  • Waterfall charts
    The waterfall chart is used to show how an initial value is affected by a series of intermediate positive or negative values.
  • Treemap charts
    The treemap chart displays hierarchical data as a set of nested rectangles.
  • Heatmap charts
    The heatmap chart displays individual data values in a matrix following a color scale.
  • Line column charts
    The line column chart combines the column and line charts.
  • Funnel charts
    The funnel chart shows a process with progressively decreasing proportions amounting to 100 percent in total.
  • About geo charts
    There are three geo charts that let you visualize geographical data in ThoughtSpot.
  • About sankey charts
    Sankey charts show a flow from one set of values to another, usually with visual emphasis (brighter colors or larger bandwidths) for comparison of the values (e.g., top cities in terms of sales might be emphasized).
  • About pivot tables
    Pivot tables in ThoughtSpot use the well known drag-and-drop interface. Creating a pivot table enables exploring alternate visualization of data in a wide table. The basic idea is that some data is easier to consume when laid out horizontally, while others, vertically.

Charts with multiple measures on the y-axis

You can have multiple measures on the y-axis of many charts, which is a great additional way of presenting information in a chart.

Example of multiple measures on the y-axis of a stacked column chart.

Charts which support multiple measures on the y-axis:

  • Column
  • Stacked Column
  • Bar
  • Stacked Bar
  • Line
  • Area
  • Stacked Area
  • Waterfall
  • Line Column
  • Line Stacked Column

To learn more, see Stack multiple measures on the y-axis.